• Lots of fresh green beans, about 5 cups if you have it.
  • 2 TBL. olive oil or butter or bacon grease
  • hot pan
  • dash of salt over everything
  • garlic powder (I've used fresh garlic, minced)

Even if you aren’t growing food in your yard and you don’t have a garden, you can still eat seasonally and locally and healthfully. Try it!

My family has a recipe that we call “Granny Beans.”  My grandma always grows too many green beans, always has, always will. Then she par boils them and freezes them and we eat them at every family gathering for the rest of the year. This year when I offered to bring sauteed Chard, everyone hesitated, stating that Granny was bringing the beans and we would have enough vegetables. Well, I insisted and they were very pleased. We did still have beans as well though.

Her recipe is nothing too un-ordinary or special, but they became “Granny Beans” because she always brought them and …here’s the best part…she always burns them slightly. Well usually. So true Granny Beans are a bit dark, caramelized, and very soft.

Here is the general recipe, alter as you wish. But do give it a try, it’s dee-lish!

Lots of fresh green beans, about 5 cups if you have it.

2 TBL. olive oil or butter or bacon grease

hot pan

dash of salt over everything

garlic powder (I’ve used fresh garlic, minced)

Saute for at least 30 minutes on low to medium heat, stirring every few minutes.

My variation above was to add 4 fresh garden potatoes and black pepper and I cooked the whole thing on low for a whole hour. It was nice and soft and well cooked, not burned. We enjoyed this as a side dish to grilled salmon burgers and grilled corn.

I had never grilled corn before.

I don’t think we soaked them long enough in water before cooking, as the outer leaves burnt right off after a few minutes, but it was tasty.